Jerry Scott

JERRY SCOTT  ROUGHSTOCK

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF THE CLOVIS RODEO

APRIL 2- MAY 31, 2014

ARTHOP & ARTIST RECEPTION: THURSDAY, APRIL 3rd, 5-8 PM

 

1821 Gallery & Studios is honored to be exhibiting the newest work by Jerry Scott.

 

Open almost any newspaper to the funnies and you’re likely to find Baby Blues and Zits. The two popular internationally syndicated comic strips are both co-creations of Jerry Scott (Baby Blues with Rick Kirkman, and Zits with Jim Borgman). Scott is one of two living cartoonists-and just the fourth in history- who have two daily comic strips that both appear in more than 1,000 newspapers. Jerry’s comic strips reach over 100 million readers daily in 43 countries and 14 languages.

 

Throughout the development of Jerry’s comic strip career he painted for pleasure and creative expression. With the comic strips well established, Jerry began to paint more seriously in 2011. He is mostly self-taught, but he has taken painting classes from Alan Hancock College, Phoenix College, and Cal Poly State University. He has attended workshops conducted by Carol Marine and Karen Jurick.

 

As an emerging oil painter he continues to explore, experiment and refine his unique style. The contemporary interpretation of the American West is his favorite subject, with humor and people at work as a frequent underlying theme. Jerry often likes to work a large canvas, perhaps as a direct contrast to the tiny panels of his comic strips.

 

Last year the folks behind the great Clovis Rodeo allowed Jerry to live a dream come true by going behind the chutes before and during the PBR bull riding event. He brought his camera and was able to record some images of the action. Some of those images became paintings, or parts of paintings that you will see in this show. The modern American west has been the subject of his work for the past several years, concentrating on the people and animals that work the land, exploring the patterns, values, textures and color relationships.

 

He enjoys painting many types of subjects, but is most comfortable when there’s some level of humor involved in the composition. He is happiest when his paintings connect with his collectors on a personal level… especially with a smile.